The opinions expressed and information contained in this publication are given in good faith, may be subject to change without notice, and are as of the date issued. This publication discusses general market activity, industry or sector trends, or other broad-based economic, market or political conditions and should not be construed as research or investment advice and does not represent a complete analysis of every material fact with respect to the economy, financial markets, interest rates, and any industry or sector mentioned in the publication. The graphs and charts presented were created for informational purpose only and may use data sourced from third parties. The accuracy and completeness of sourced data is believed to be reliable, but has not been independently verified.

Any investment idea or strategy discussed herein is provided for information purposes only. There is no guarantee that a strategy will achieve its objective and the readiness and efficacy of such strategy will depend on your particular facts and circumstances. Please consult with your independent professional advisers for final recommendations before changing or implementing a financial strategy.

Investment products mentioned herein, including stocks, bonds, and mutual funds may lose value and carry investment risks. Due diligence processes seek to diminish, but cannot eliminate risk, nor do they imply low risk. Asset allocation, diversification and rebalancing do not guarantee a profit or protect against a loss in declining markets. Past performance is not indicative of future results, which may vary.

Investing in equity securities involves volatility risk, market risk, business risk, and industry risk. Volatility risk is the chance that the value of a stock will fall. The price of stocks also fluctuate in response to economic and business developments. Business risk is the chance that a specific company's stock will fall because of issues affecting it, such as the company is managed. Industry risk is the chance that a set of factors particular to an industry group will adversely affect stock prices within the industry. Stocks of small and medium-sized companies entail special risks, such as limited product lines, markets, and financial resources, and experience greater volatility than securities of larger, more established companies.

International investing involves unique risks, including foreign taxation, foreign currency fluctuation risks, risks related with possible variances in financial standards and other risks associated with potential political, social and economic developments. Investing in emerging markets may involve greater risks than investing in more developed countries. In addition, concentration of investments in a single region may result in greater volatility.

The opinions expressed and information contained in any article published in the Vault are given in good faith and considered reliable. However, such opinions and information are subject to change without notice and are provided only as of the date issued. Neither Boston Private nor its affiliates warrant the completeness or accuracy of such information. Any third-party opinion is solely the opinion of its author and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Boston Private or its affiliates. The materials on this website are for informational purposes only and do not take into account your particular investment objective, financial situation or need. Since each client’s situation is unique, you should consult your financial advisor and/or tax planning professional before acting on any information provided herein.